The more invigorating an experience the more humans understand and retain the information presented to them. This fact is leading to an increasing popularity in video podcasts or vlogs.

This idea was reiterated in The Social Media Bible when the author said, “When two humans want to express an idea, thought, or concept, 55 percent of the communication comes from body language, 38 percent from voice, and only a mere 7 percent from the words.”

Adding video to podcasts makes them more engaging and increases the chances of viewers staying with the podcast to the end. The book points out an inspiring example of using vlogs as a marketing tool with “Will it Blend?” Here’s one of my favorite episodes of “Will it Blend?” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29qOT4JozSw&feature=relmfu.

The “Will it Blend?” videos have gotten millions of views on YouTube. Within 24 hours of the videos going viral the blenders sold out of stock. This was basically free advertising for the blender company (besides the items destroyed in the blender).

Another vlog campaign I thought was very affective was the “Swagger Wagon” videos for the Toyota Sienna on YouTube. Check it out: http://www.youtube.com/toyotaUSA/?x=1sienna. The Toyota’s YouTube video has close to 10 million views in a little over a year.

Rather than paying for traditional 30 second advertising spots companies can, with creativity, obtain just as many views without the ridiculous price tag.

The Social Media Bible says that in 2010, YouTube users were uploading 13 hours of video every minute and more than 1 billion video downloads per day. Like all social media statistic, I am sure these numbers are outdated and have probably doubled in the last year.

This chapter also highlights the fact that as Americans our government does not currently censor online videos (except for child pornography). The FCC is responsible for monitoring the internet, but they have chosen to for the time being to leave it uncensored.

For now vlogging remains uncensored and available to anyone with the technology and talent. Once again I kick myself for mentioning Justin Bieber, but YouTube is responsible for his big break into the business. Now come on if the Biebs can do it, anyone can.

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